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Paying for School

If You're a Student, You May Be Eligible for a $2,500 Tax Credit

By Troy Onink
Contributor to Forbes

Taxpayers who paid qualified college tuition and fee expenses in 2014 may be able to claim the American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC) worth up to $2,500 per eligible child. Despite repeated calls for simplifying education tax incentives, frequent legislation submitted in Congress and ongoing confusion between taxpayers and the IRS about how and when to claim the various education tax credits, no one has succeeded in simplifying the mess, yet. The good news? The credit is available through 2017. That means $10,000 of tax savings per child in the next four years. Following are the rules to claim the credit properly, with links to the forms and instructions.

Tips on Preparing for Military Transition From a Marine Veteran

Service To School: Helping Veterans Get Into Top Schools

By Thomas Ehrlich and Ernestine Fu
Forbes

After serving in Iraq together, Tim Hsia and Augusto Giacoman returned home to pursue graduate degrees. Hsia enrolled in a joint law and business degree program at Stanford University in 2010, while Giacoman started business school at New York University in 2009. Both officers’ educations were mostly funded by the Post 9/11 GI Bill, a bill that provides up to 36 months of education benefits. Continue Reading

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Which Educational Benefits Are You Entitled To As a Veteran?

Veterans of the United States armed forces are eligible for a wide range of federal and state educational benefits. However, knowing which ones you’re entitled to and how to apply for them can be confusing.

Writer Ann Carrns helps point you in the right direction in this New York Times article:

After Military Service, Taking Advantage of Educational Benefits Continue Reading

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The More You Know: Transitioning From Military Life

Kelly Ryan is American Military University’s Midwest Education Coordinator, which means she spends her days working with servicemembers and their families who are making the change from military to civilian life. For some, the transition can be discouraging as they’re faced with new decisions to make and new paths to follow.

As Kelly notes in this informative article for Military Spouse, many of those decisions involve education: where to go to school, what to study, how to sign up, and, of course, how to pay for it. Continue Reading

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For-Profit Colleges: An Attractive Choice for Career-Minded Veterans

More than a million veterans have used their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to cover education costs. Many of those men and women chose to attend for-profit institutions of higher learning.

But why? What do for-profit schools, such as American Military University (AMU), offer veterans that traditional state schools don’t?

John Aldrich, AMU’s associate vice president for military and community college outreach, has some answers in the following article posted at the RallyPoint website:

Education: It’s a Veteran’s Choice Continue Reading

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